Who is going to use Event Monger and how are they going to use it?

In my previous post about Event Monger I said that I would post up a list of specific end-user scenarios. A scenario is a dirt simple – plain english description of how someone will use the system. They aren’t really supposed to be a technical description, but more something that you can agree with the customer on – in this case the customer is me so it was easy to reach agreement.

Defining Personas

In Event Monger there are really three different types of users, Organisers, Speakers and Attendees. To help understand these users a little bit more those links go to copies of (very small) persona documents that I have written. If I find out more about the users that will be using the system I’ll update those documents.

The Workflow

The users of the system participate in an overall workflow which results in the running of a successful event. The workflow, combined with the use of Event Monger will have five stages that I’ve been able to distill, these are Install, Plan, Promote, Attend and Review.

EventWorkflow

Each of these steps in the workflow have scenarios that support them, and those scenarios can be mapped against the personas.

Installation Scenarios

The following scenarios are related to the initial installation of the Event Monger software. I want this to be as seemless as possible. The people doing the work should only need to have some ASP.NET 2.0 hosting space with a SQL Server account.

  • Event Organiser
    • The event organiser installs and configures Event Monger at a remote ASP.NET hosting provider.
    • The event organiser logs into Event Monger and defines a list of other event organisers.
    • The event organiser logs into Event Monger and adds event specific flair.

Planning Scenarios

This is really just the initial data entry required to get the event kicking over itself, doing things like setting the themes for the event by defining tracks for example.

  • Event Organiser
    • The event organiser defines a list of venues, rooms and dates, and provides links to useful information resources.
    • The event organiser defines a list of event tracks with a brief overview of what they are about.

Promotion Scenarios

For a technical community event its a pretty good idea to put your ear to the ground and figure out what people want to hear about (within broad guidelines). So this is all about getting speakers to submit things they are happy to present on and then getting people who _might_ attend to vote on those submissions.

  • Event Organiser
    • The event organiser opens the Event Monger site up for submission of session abstracts.
    • The event organiser accepts a session abstract.
    • The event organiser rejects a session abstract.
    • The event organiser opens the Event Monger site up for voting on accepted session abstracts.
    • The event organiser creates the final schedule for the event based on prospective event attendee feedback.
    • The event organiser sends a notification to prospective event speakers asking them to confirm their attendance.
    • The event organiser sends a notification to prospective event attendees asking them to confirm their attendance.
    • The event organiser sends a reminder to event speakers and attendees about the upcoming event.
    • The event organiser changes the schedule based on a speaker cancellation.
  • Event Speaker
    • The prospective event speaker registers on the site and submits a session abstract.
    • The prospective event speaker registers on the site and submits an additional session abstract.
    • The prospective event speaker logs into the Event Monger site and confirms their attendance.
  • Event Attendee
    • The prospective event attendee registers on the site and votes on session abstracts.
    • The prospective event attendee logs into Event Monger and votes on more session abstracts.
    • The prospective event attendee logs into the Event Monger site and confirms their attendance at a particular venue.
    • The prospective event attendee registers on the site for the first time and confirms their attendance.

Attendance Scenarios

Once you are at the event the site tends to be forgotten, but it can actually be a useful posting area for all sorts of information. For example, at Code Camp Oz last year a whole bunch of MVPs held a number of informal sessions on a much more diverse range of topics than the Code Camp was really intended to cover. A specific room wasn’t scheduled for them so they just put up on a whiteboard which room they were doing their stuff in – great for BOF sessions too.

Of course – this is also a good time to collect all the collateral that the presenters used during their session if they are happy to share it.

  • Event Organiser
    • The event organiser opens up the Event Monger site for the submission of community notices.
  • Event Speaker
    • The event speaker uploads slide decks and any other collateral to the Event Monger site and associates it with their session abstracts.
  • Event Attendee
    • The event attendee logs into the Event Monger site and reviews and adds to the community notices.

Review Scenarios

That’s a wrap! After the event there are a few things that need to be done like writing up a quick review of the event so that if someone comes to visit the site its clear that the event has passed. Its also a good time to send thank-yous so that hopefully the speakers and attendees come back again next time. I’m not quite sure how this part of the workflow works with multi-venue events that span different time periods.

  • Event Organiser
    • The event organiser closes down registration and writes a post event synopsis.
    • The event organiser downloads a mailing list of all event speakers and attendees.
    • The event organiser sends a thank-you message to event speakers.
    • The event organiser sends a thank-you message to event attendees.
  • Event Attendee
    • The event attendee downloads collateral assocaited with their favourite sessions.

Your thoughts?

What are you thoughts about the scenarios that I have outlined above? I’m not sure if I am going to get to all of them before the 4th of August so I’m going to do a little bit of prioritisation. I’d love to hear from you on what is most important, what can be dropped, and have I missed something completely?

8 thoughts on “Who is going to use Event Monger and how are they going to use it?

  1. Drew

    Drooling. Looks complicated. How long have you had to work on this? I am assuming the samples will be published in C#? Wish for VB.

    Working on similar project and using this week. Certain it’ll be obsolete when you publish yours!

    I’ll keep checking in.

  2. Mitch Denny Post author

    Hi Drew,

    I’m really only starting working on it in earnest this week, it will be written in C#. Don’t be so quick to throw out your code though🙂

  3. Kevin Jones

    Hi Mitch,

    I work for a non-profit that host about 60 meetings a year. Meetings have between 20 and 80 attendees. We are unique in that we don’t charge for our meetings; the price is included in membership dues. We do however, charge prorata for group events like going to dinner after the meeting session. My ideal scenario would be as follows:

    1) Staff would generate a list of invitees from our database.
    2) An email with a identifiable link would be sent to invitees.
    4) Invitees would click on link taking them to a form prefilled with their information
    3) If they did not want to attend there would be a choice to decline
    4) To attend, invitee would enter arrival date, departure date and CC number for hotel reservation (we do hotel reservations for members) and click submit.
    6) Email confirmation would be generated by the system for successful registrations
    7) After the meeting, staff would be able to bring up the list of invitees and enter prorata charges for each attendee on a single form. Form submit would enter all transactions into our AR system.

    I am interested in seeing your system once complete. I may be able to modify to meet the extra functionality I need although I am not a developer by trade.

  4. Mitch Denny

    Hi Kevin,

    To be honest, it wasn’t a core scenario that I had envisaged. It adds a level of complexity not typically required of .NET developer events (which is the main use case here).

  5. Matt Caiozzo

    Hi Mitch,

    I was really exicted when I came accross this as a future project. I am helping out a non profit orgainzation that is strating to implement a new approach to meetings they will have possible a hunder meetings that go on for a 3 month periord of time through out the year.

    I can not wait to see your system once completed.

  6. Mitch Denny Post author

    Hi Matt,

    Great to hear that Matt. I am looking forward to blogging about it more once I clear my plate off a bit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s